travel

Will of iron, or steel/aluminum in my case (Drive Day 1 minus 14 years, 38 days)

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 Most people bequeath their kids the family home, heirloom jewels, maybe an antique gun collection. But I don’t have kids, jewels or guns and I’m trading in my Capitol Hill home for a vintage aluminum truck camper. So that’s what I’m leaving to my sister and step-son if I don’t make it through this impending road trip through 13 Latin American countries.

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Washington DC, photo courtesy Gary Geboy

It’s not so far-fetched, I tell the lawyer who stares at me like I’ve got three eyes. My family barely survived the same trip in 1973. Coups, revolutions, stints in jail, earthquakes and 61 separate roadside breakdowns ended in scrapping the camper for cash in Bolivia. Dad doesn’t even remember exactly where. I’m just covering my bases.

“Vehicles aren’t normally considered permanent assets,” the lawyer says. “It’s not just a vehicle,” I tell him. “It’s a brand new Ford F350 with four-wheel drive.”

Follow this bonus-material blog and ride along on a one-year road trip that inspired the memoir The Drive: Searching for Lost Memories on the Pan American Highway. On sale June 13th. Pre order through the buy-the-book links at the bottom of the landing page on my teresabrucebooks.com website or here or here. Like The Drive’s Facebook page and tweet back at me @writerteresa.

Day Planner Zombie (Drive Day 1 minus 14 years and 40 days)

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That point when planning for a restful vacation (or a one-year detour from corporate life) gives you heart palpitations? I’m there. I’ve given notice: kissing my 6-figure, A-list agency producer job goodbye with no backup plan. Gary and I will retrace the road trip I barely survived as a 7-year old, down the Pan-American Highway to Tierra Del Fuego. I’ll miss my colleagues, jazz at HR 57, dance class at Joy of Motion, the smell of fries at Ben’s Chili Bowl, regular paychecks – but not being an undead slave to this crazed schedule.

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Washington DC, photo by Gary Geboy

Follow this bonus-material blog and ride along on a one-year road trip that inspired the memoir The Drive: Searching for Lost Memories on the Pan American Highway. On sale June 13th. Pre order through the buy-the-book links at the bottom of the landing page on my teresabrucebooks.com website or here or here. Like The Drive’s Facebook page and tweet back at me @writerteresa.

Cómo se dice terrified? (Drive Day 1 minus 14 years and 43 days)

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I’ve convinced my boss at Ogilvy PR Worldwide that Berlitz Spanish classes during my lunch hour are an appropriate way to spend down my “professional development” benefits. I do produce health care videos for Spanish audiences, sometimes, kinda, sorta.

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Mejor que nada: photo by Gary Geboy

In reality I’m trying to recapture the fluency of my youth. At seven I was a backseat driver in my father’s camper on a year-long road trip down the Pan-American Highway. I spoke Spanish so well I negotiated my dad’s release from jail a few times, or so the family stories go. Thirty years later and I butcher verb tenses. No problema, except that my husband and I are about to retrace that journey in our own camper. Reza por mí.

Follow this bonus-material blog and ride along on a one-year road trip that inspired the memoir The Drive: Searching for Lost Memories on the Pan American Highway. On sale June 13th. Pre order through the buy-the-book links at the bottom of the landing page on my teresabrucebooks.com website or here or here. Like The Drive’s Facebook page and tweet back at me @writerteresa.

 

Dog who doesn’t know what’s coming (Drive Day 1 minus 14 years, 45 days)

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Wipeout the beautiful and clueless. A 16-year-old Mexican immigrant mutt who rules the sidewalk of C Street, S.W. in Capital (foot)Hill, DC. I bought her from a street-corner vendor in Guadalajara when she fit into the palm of my hand. Now she’s a vet-shaved, cancer survivor with enough strength to chase squirrels but not to climb stairs. We haven’t decided if she can survive the next chapter of her storied life: a road trip down the Pan-American Highway in a vintage truck camper. Is it cruel to uproot her or worse to leave her with friends until we return?

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Washington, DC: photo by Gary Geboy

 

Follow this bonus-material blog and ride along on a one-year road trip that inspired the memoir The Drive: Searching for Lost Memories on the Pan American Highway. On sale June 13th. Pre order through the buy-the-book links at the bottom of the landing page on my teresabrucebooks.com website or here or here. Like The Drive’s Facebook page and tweet back at me @writerteresa.

 

 

My scared, brave mom (Drive day 1 minus 44 years, 48 days)

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On Mother’s Days past and in earlier memoirs I’ve celebrated Other Mothers but this post is dedicated to Beverly Jean Bruce. Shown here trying not to look at my father’s camera. Not so much shy as overwhelmed; a month into a year-long journey/escape? down the Pan American Highway with two little girls, one of them seven-year-old me.

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Xochilmilco, Mexico: photo by David Bruce

Not shown here: the bravery it took to pick up the pieces of a family after my little brother John John’s accidental death. I’m still awestruck by her courage. By the courage of all moms who’ve lost and lived to tell the story.

Follow this bonus-material blog and ride along on a one-year road trip that inspired the memoir The Drive: Searching for Lost Memories on the Pan American Highway. On sale June 13th. Pre order through the buy-the-book links at the bottom of the landing page on my teresabrucebooks.com website or here or here. Like The Drive’s Facebook page and tweet back at me @writerteresa.

Share this with friends confused about how to follow a blog — like mine!

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First — it’s not always an age thing. Although the media makes it seem like EVERYONE reads blogs and listens to podcasts — lots of smart, well-read, well-traveled people haven’t caught the bug. They think blogs are complicated to follow, are turned off by the word “subscribe” and worry that following will get them on some horrid email marketing list.

Since I’m about to reboot my blog on Mother’s Day with ride-along/read-along bonus material from my upcoming book The Drive: Searching for Lost Memories on the Pan-American highway, this is a primer you can forward or share that demystifies the process:

Step 1: Hop online and type in the blog’s address

step 1 - search bar

Step 2: when the blog pops up, look for the “follow” button on the bottom right of the screen

step2 look for follow me

Step 3: click the follow box

step 3 click follow

Step 4: it’ll ask for your email adress

step 4 enter email

Step 5: check your email for a welcome message

step 5 check your email

Step 6: it’ll want to confirm that you want to subscribe (which is a terrible word since it’s free)

step 6 confirm

Then you’re in. Each time there’s a new post (which can be pictures and/or a short paragraph) you get that email and can either open it if you have time to read or delete it if you don’t. You can catch up the next time.

you're in!

Shoot me a comment if you think a primer on leaving comments would be helpful too.