Stripping the South of Sentimentality

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courtesy of Tom Nakashima
courtesy of Tom Nakashima

 

 

Courtesy of Gary Geboy
courtesy of Gary Geboy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s a Southern art exhibit opening in Charleston SC next Thursday, but don’t expect the two featured artists to drop blessed hearts or gardens and guns into their art speak. In fact, don’t expect art speak at all. Both painter Tom Nakashima and photographer Gary Geboy would rather discuss just about anything than how you should interpret their work.

It’s not that they’re shy about it. Nakashima exhibits internationally and has work at the Smithsonian and The Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Geboy’s work has shown from London and Barcelona to the CD cover of a Czech Republic country band.

“If I could put what it means in words,” Nakashima says, “I’d try poetry instead of painting.”

Actually, poetic might be the best way to describe both artists’ work. Geboy’s wet plate collodion and platinum palladium photographs are haiku: formal in their sparseness. The complexity and nuance in each work on handmade Japanese paper is evident only up personal and close – in the textures he creates as backdrops, the elegance of the shapes and the nuance of the tones.

Platinum Palladium Print
Geboy: Platinum Palladium Print

 

 

 

Wet Glass Plate used as negative
Geboy: Wet Glass Plate used as negative

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nakashima is more free verse: an Allen Ginsberg howl of color, collage and rhythm. He sees what ordinary people see when we pass a pile of up-dug trees, even hops out of his car and takes photos of them. But then he paints layer upon layer of interpretation, repetition and abstraction until the image is reborn as something only he could see.

Final print
Nakashima: Final painting

 

 

 

Photo used as study
Nakashima: Photo used as study

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geboy and Nakashima will meet each other for the first time on February 12th, the opening night of their joint show “Organic Legacies.” Geboy lives in Beaufort, SC and Nakashima is the William S. Morris Eminent Scholar in Arts at Augusta State University. Geboy says his work is most influenced by the photographers W. Eugene Smith and Matt Mahurin, where Nakashima returns to Picasso and Matisse for inspiration. They both come from practical, 2nd generation immigrant fathers who couldn’t imagine their sons becoming professional artists and both have spent more years in Washington D.C. than the Deep South they now call home.

 

So why the pairing at the Rebekah Jacob Gallery in Charleston, curated by a Southern art historian who describes her gallery as focusing on contemporary painters, sculptors & photographers from the American South? Because the South is more than Paula Deen, shrimp boat docks and carefully pruned azaleas. It’s also the burning mattress from which sprung Flannery O’Connor, the muddy Mississippi that floated up William Faulkner. In Nakashima and Geboy, she found seekers of that deeper South.

“Neither artist grew up in the South so both Nakashima and Geboy tend, by default, to strip the nostalgia and find treasured, celebratory beauty in the landscape and architecture in an objective way,” Jacob says. “They highlight and preserve the natural beauty that makes the South so unique:  abandoned houses, tree piles, foliage. But they do so with intellect and exploratory richness.  Artists who don’t have their intellect and artistic skill-sets could never get what they get.”

 

garygeboyphotography.com
garygeboyphotography.com

 

 

 

 

tomnakashima.com
tomnakashima.com

In the art-buying world that translates into a shared collector base — those who have wide knowledge of art through collecting and global travels yet have some connection to the South.  And most likely a sense of humor. Both Nakashima and Geboy have poked fun at what it means to be a “Southern” artist. Geboy uses quirky, dark narratives to accompany images in his decidedly unsentimental “Carry Me Home” collection.

www.carrymehomeproject.blogspot.com
http://www.carrymehomeproject.blogspot.com

 

“Some of these things actually happened,” Geboy insists. “The stories have just been changed to protect innocent names.”

 

www.tomnakashima.com
http://www.tomnakashima.com

And when Nakashima set out to make his first deliberately “Southern” painting, he picked a dilapidated building he imagines the Devil would call home.

“It’s a big hit in Georgia,” Nakashima says. “Smart people like to laugh at themselves.”

One thought on “Stripping the South of Sentimentality

    Jacquelyn Markham said:
    February 3, 2015 at 9:38 PM

    This exhibit looks fabulous. I admire Gary’s work and look forward to learning about Nakashima’s. Yes, poetic, quiet and powerful. Jacquelyn

    Like

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